News from The Economist

A dinosaur’s tail preserved in amber

A dinosaur’s tail preserved in amber

Who was a pretty boy, then? TWO decades ago palaeontologists were astonished to discover impressions of feathers in rock around the petrified bones of dinosaurs that had clearly, from the anatomy those bones displayed, been unable to fly when they were a

yesterday, 17:56 in Science &Technology
 
The Federal Reserve prepares to raise interest rates again

The Federal Reserve prepares to raise interest rates again

AMERICA’S central bank tries to be predictable. When in December 2015 it raised interest rates for the first time since 2006, nobody was much surprised. The central bank had telegraphed its intentions to a tee. Similarly, if the overwhelming consensus in

yesterday, 17:03 in Business
 
Ancient eclipses show how days are getting shorter

Ancient eclipses show how days are getting shorter

AS THE well-known Australian philosopher, Kylie Minogue, once pointed out, it can be a source of comfort to remember that, no matter what else is happening, the world still turns. Unfortunately, things are not quite so simple. Thanks to the moon’s gravit

yesterday, 16:55 in Science &Technology
 
How clean is solar power?

How clean is solar power?

THAT solar panels do not emit greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide when they are generating electricity is without question. This is why they are beloved of many who worry about the climate-altering potential of such gases. Sceptics, though, observe t

yesterday, 16:55 in Science &Technology
 
Tata Steel forges a deal at Port Talbot

Tata Steel forges a deal at Port Talbot

IN MARCH Tata Steel announced that it was to sell its British steelmaking facilities, including the giant works at Port Talbot in Wales. The news caused consternation. Four thousand jobs were at stake at the loss-making plant, as well as several thousand

yesterday, 16:38 in Politics
 
Why British businesses don’t scale up

Why British businesses don’t scale up

A startup that scaled up OFF a posh square in the south-western city of Bath, Dominic and Ali Bevan are honing their assault on Britain’s lucrative wedding gift market. For now, it is dominated by high street behemoths such as John Lewis. The Bevans set

yesterday, 16:38 in Politics
 
Oxford University tries a new approach to recruiting poor students

Oxford University tries a new approach to recruiting poor students

WHILE at school, the idea of going to Oxford University “might as well have been like going to Mars,” says Varaidzo Kativhu, an 18-year-old from Brierley Hill, a town in the West Midlands. Yet now she is on a foundation year at Lady Margaret Hall, one of

yesterday, 16:38 in Politics
 
Britain’s wheezing railways are set for a shake-up

Britain’s wheezing railways are set for a shake-up

THERE has long been a joke in political circles that Britain’s Department for Transport never produces any cheerful headlines. Its press office has in the past been caught using royal funerals and terrorist attacks to “bury bad news”. But its problems mo

yesterday, 16:38 in Politics
 
High fliers

High fliers

Politics and current affairs China’s Future. By David Shambaugh. Polity; 195 pages; $19.95 and £14.99 No country has modernised its economy without also becoming a democracy. A respected American political scientist asks whether China can break the mould

yesterday, 16:32 in Art & Culture
 

What we wrote...

The Wealth of Humans: Work, Power and Status in the Twenty-First Century. By Ryan Avent. St Martin’s Press; 288 pages; $26.99. Allen Lane; £25 The world of work is changing fast and in unexpected ways, by our economics columnist. The Birthday Book. Edite

yesterday, 16:32 in Art & Culture
 
A Dallas public pension fund suffers a run

A Dallas public pension fund suffers a run

The mayor and Dallas’s finest BANK runs, with depositors queuing round the block to get their cash, are a familiar occurrence in history. A run on a pension fund is virtually unprecedented. But that is what is happening in Dallas, where policemen and fir

yesterday, 16:21 in Business
 
An epic legal battle with big implications for litigation funding

An epic legal battle with big implications for litigation funding

FOUNDED by former African American slaves, the west African country of Liberia has produced an insurance case that has bounced between the courts of several countries for a quarter of a century, condemning the claimants and their opponent to a generation

yesterday, 16:21 in Business
 
Winners and losers from the Trump stockmarket rally

Winners and losers from the Trump stockmarket rally

SELL on the rumour, buy on the news runs one version of a hoary stockmarket adage. And it certainly applied to last month’s presidential election. Before the poll, many investors were concerned about the risk that Donald Trump might become the 45th presi

yesterday, 16:21 in Business
 
Italian banks after the referendum

Italian banks after the referendum

THE first casualty was Matteo Renzi’s hold on office. As he had promised, Italy’s prime minister resigned on December 7th, three days after voters rejected his proposals to overhaul the constitution. The second is likely to be a planned private-sector re

yesterday, 16:21 in Business
 

Why house prices haven’t fallen since the Brexit vote

“HOUSE prices will be hit by at least 10% in the ‘profound economic shock’ that would result from a vote to Leave the EU,” the Treasury warned in May, a month before the referendum. A fall of nearly 20% in two years was quite possible, it added. The hous

yesterday, 15:43 in Politics
 
Page:


News Widget for Webmasters



Bring Eugene's son back home immediately

Realtime News

 

«
»
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
      1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31