News archive from 15 July 2015

Trade unions face biggest Conservative offensive for decades

The biggest crackdown on trade union rights for 30 years will be unveiled on Wednesday, including new plans to criminalise picketing, permit employers to hire strike-breaking agency staff and choke off the flow of union funds to the Labour party. The...

Guardian, 00:02 in Business
 
MSPs warn against ‘scapegoating’ in crash inquiry

MSPs warn against ‘scapegoating’ in crash inquiry

Individual police officers must not be "scapegoated" by an inquiry into the fatal tragedy which saw two Scots left in their crashed car for days after the accident was reported. Labour and the Liberal Democrats have raised fears after...

Scotsman, 00:03 in Politics
 
Nama deal: Ian Coulter says no politician or their relatives were due to receive money from sale

Nama deal: Ian Coulter says no politician or their relatives were due to receive money from sale

The solicitor at the centre of the Nama loan sale controversy has said that no politician, nor any relative of any politician was ever to receive any money from the deal. Ian Coulter is the former managing partner of Tughans solicitors in Belfast and...

BBC, 00:05 in Regional
 

In Bruges director Martin McDonagh returns to Royal Court with new play

Martin McDonagh, the playwright and writer/director of the films In Bruges and Seven Psychopaths, is to return to the London stage with his first new UK play in 10 years. The Royal Court theatre will stage McDonagh’s new play Hangmen, telling the...

 

Poltergeist posters cleared despite more than 70 complaints over clown image

People afraid of clowns have failed in a bid to get “distressing” posters for the film Poltergeist banned. More than 70 coulrophobics and parents complained about posters and bus ads featuring the head of a scruffy, smiling clown doll with the tagline...

 

Artist Douglas Gordon faces repair bill after axe attack on Manchester theatre

A Turner prizewinning artist who is directing a play at the Manchester international festival has been hit with a repair bill after taking an axe to the walls of a new £25m theatre. Douglas Gordon, who won the Turner prize in 1996 for video piece...

 

National Grid confident its power plans can prevent winter blackouts

The UK faces a tighter energy crunch than last year, with more contingency measures needed to ensure the lights stay on, an assessment from National Grid has shown. The gap between total electricity generating capacity and peak demand would fall to...

Guardian, 00:09 in Business
 
Obama lays out a sweeping criminal justice reform plan

Obama lays out a sweeping criminal justice reform plan

President Barack Obama has called sweeping reforms for the US criminal justice system including curbing the use of solitary confinement and voting rights for felons. He said lengthy mandatory minimum sentences should be reduced - or thrown out...

BBC, 00:09 in World News
 
UK spare electricity capacity to fall this winter

UK spare electricity capacity to fall this winter

The risk of blackouts this winter has increased compared with a year ago according to National Grid. It says the closure of some power stations would have left spare capacity on the system at just 1.2%, the worst for a decade. It has secured extra...

BBC, 00:10 in Business
 
10 ways to get your graduation noticed

10 ways to get your graduation noticed

This is the graduation season, with universities awash with gowns, photographers and ceremonial handshakes. But how are you going to get noticed in the sea of catering tents and pompous speeches? 1) It's all about the hat: What is it about hats and...

BBC, 00:10 in Business
 
Would Grexit have been a better deal?

Would Grexit have been a better deal?

It will require Herculean efforts on all sides, including Greece. That was the assessment of Mark Carney the Bank of England governor when he spoke about the agreement reached at the eurozone summit. It's a widely shared view. So would Greece have...

BBC, 00:10 in Business
 

Cuts in acute psychiatric care may have gone too far, inquiry finds

Cuts to the number of acute hospital beds for adults needing psychiatric care in England may have gone too far, according to an independent inquiry led by a former NHS boss. Significant numbers of people are having to travel long distances for care,...

Guardian, 00:11 in Health
 

Record number of people undergoing amputations because of diabetes

A record 135 people a week are having to undergo amputations as a result of diabetes, NHS figures show. Previously unpublished figures from Public Health England (PHE) show that 18,080 patients with diabetes underwent an amputation of some sort...

Guardian, 00:11 in Health
 

NHS care of elderly patients often poor and lacking dignity, report says

More than a million over-65s a year are treated poorly while in hospital, for example by not being helped to eat, according to a new report which has prompted calls for the NHS to improve care of older people. Elderly patients are confronted with...

Guardian, 00:11 in Health
 

Fossilised sperm found in Antarctica is world's oldest, say scientists

The world’s oldest fossilised sperm has been discovered in the wall of a worm cocoon found in Antarctica, raising scientists’ hopes of recovering more extremely rare fossils of microscopic soft-bodied lifeforms. The prehistoric sex cells belong to a...

 


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